Turmeric, what makes it so good?

So we’ve all come past the term, and we’ve heard wonderful stuff about it. But how does it work? What makes turmeric a powerful supplement?

Lets first start with a bit of history! Turmeric, the bright yellow vegetable that strongly resembles ginger in shape and size, isn’t a new discovery. It has been used as a healing remedy in old Indian civilizations for as long as 3,000 years. The term “Turmeric” is a Sanskrit synonym for the color yellow. Turmeric is widely used in Indian cuisines, domestic rituals, skincare and as a remedy for a variety of ailments.

That’s all very nice, but what makes turmeric work? If you’re a skeptic like me, then your average online blog or article just isn’t good enough evidence to go purchase capsules or consume it in any way (I do also hope that you do your own research about products before buying them and of course; check with your health professional that there aren’t any contradictions with medication/s you may be taking).

Turmeric’s main active ingredient is curcumin. There are many claims made about what curcumin is good for with hardly any evidence to back it up. I decided to look up all the trials for curcumin on Cochrane Library, one of the more trusted resources for recorded trials. One of the trials that proved curcumin to have a positive effect, was the Curcumin in Combination With Mesalamine Induces Remission in Patients With Mild-to-Moderate Ulcerative Colitis in a Randomized Controlled Trial.

I was excited to see this finding and share it with you because I have been a sufferer of IBS and UC. I have personally been taking turmeric alongside medication and have found that my symptoms are far better (along with a good diet). It’s exciting to see that science is now able to provide evidence for remedies used thousands of years ago!

Do you suffer from IBS or UC? contact us via our Facebook page to have a chat! We would love to help.

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